≡ Menu

You Know #trust30

Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind. Absolve you to yourself, and you shall have the suffrage of the world.
– Ralph Waldo Emerson

In today’s Wikipediaed world of instant information, we are conditioned to have all the answers we need at our fingertips. Because, if it’s on the Web, it must be true!

But it makes me wonder why the answer which comes from others is more credible than the answer which comes from within.

To trust your own truth is scary. What if you’re wrong?

Well, what if you’re right?

What if your education, your knowledge, your experience, your failures, your successes, your heritage, your upbringing, your philosophy, your mission, your beliefs, your values, your instinct, your intuition, and your vision all combine to give you a unique perspective on the situation? To see what others don’t see?

You emerge as a leader when your truth allows you to see beyond conventional wisdom, out towards the blue oceans of unexplored possibilities.

Truth is not carved in stone. It is invented each moment as humanity moves forward, assimilating new knowledge and new experiences. No one has a monopoly on the truth.

There comes a point where you must stop looking to be validated by someone else’s truth, and start listening to your own.  You know what is true and what you need to do.

For more information

This post is part of a series inspired by The Domino Project’s #Trust30 Writing Challenge. Each day during the month of June 2011, we receive a thought from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay “Self-Reliance”, to use as a writing prompt. For more information about the #Trust30 Writing Challenge, see today’s prompt:
http://ralphwaldoemerson.me/jen-louden

Related posts

To Get The Desired Result, Ask The Right Question
http://blog.davender.com/2007/12/to-get-the-desired-result-ask-the-right-question/

A Thought About Intention
http://blog.davender.com/2008/05/a-thought-about-intention/

On The Right Questions
http://blog.davender.com/2007/03/on-the-right-questions/

Image Credit: Jeremy Brooks via Flickr
Direct link: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeremybrooks/2551580036/
Used under Creative Commons 2.0 licence

 

 

{ 0 comments… add one }

Leave a Comment

Next post:

Previous post: